When You Need Louisiana Maritime Lawyers

If You Have Suffered a Maritime Injury...

.....it is important to speak with experienced admiralty, Jones Act, and Louisiana maritime lawyers to learn what your options are. The attorneys of Gordon, Elias & Seely, L.L.P. work with clients across Louisiana who seek compensation following serious maritime injuries. The Gordon, Elias & Seely, L.L.P.  Louisiana maritime lawyers have established a long and proud reputation for protecting workers' rights. We have worked with unions and their members such as the Seafarer's International Union (SIU) to provide full and fair representation when legal help is needed. Whether you were injured on a barge along the inland waterways that stretch from Lake Charles to Lake Pontchartrain, on a vessel in the Mississippi River Delta, or an oil platform in the Gulf Coast, every Louisiana maritime lawyer in our office has the legal experience coupled with extensive resources to pursue compensation for your injuries.

The State of Louisiana Relies on its Maritime Industries

The state of Louisiana borders the Gulf of Mexico and has an abundance of ports and port related infrastructure in large part due to its expansive waterway system. These maritime ports are highly significant as they provide state owned cargo transfer facilities and equipment for many water related industries. As a result, the import-export activities of Louisiana’s ports and the offshore oil and gas service industry are significant contributors to Louisiana’s economy employing thousands of workers.

Stevedoring companies, barge fleeting, anchor salvage, dock maintenance / repair and crew boat operations, marine salvage and emergency response companies offering comprehensive marine firefighting, emergency lighting, and wreck removal services, the offshore oil and gas service industry, commercial fishermen, and cruise ships all employ numerous maritime workers. 

Related Information

Occupational Safety & Health Administration
Safety and Health Topics

From 2003 to 2010, 823 oil and gas extraction workers were killed on the job-a fatality rate seven times greater than the rate for all U.S. industries…..The information and resources provided on this web page can help workers and employers identify and eliminate hazards in their workplace.

Many of these maritime jobs are dangerous resulting in personal injuries and even death arising out of all manner of marine hazards. Maritime workers face the possibilities of collisions between vessels, well blowouts, malfunctioning equipment, shifting cargo, improper supervision of loading and unloading, and un-seaworthy vessels. Although it is the duty of the ship’s manufacturer, captain, and management to ensure that proper safety equipment is in place and that workers are thoroughly trained to prevent injury, working offshore is dangerous by its very nature. However, no matter how hazardous the work may be, many people across the state of Louisiana rely on maritime industries for their livelihood.

Highly Respected Maritime Attorneys

When you need a Louisiana maritime lawyer, a skilled, yet aggressive approach to protecting your rights both in and out of the courtroom will best serve you and your family. The Louisiana maritime lawyers of Gordon, Elias & Seely, L.L.P., a formidable team of seasoned, and highly respected attorneys, understand how important your job and your way of life is to you. We work with people such as your self, who are facing some of the most difficult challenges of their lives. We help our clients put the Jones Act and other federal and state protections, such as General Maritime Law, the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act, the Outer-Continental Shelf Lands Act, and the law of Louisiana to work for them.

Contact our office today at 800-773-6770  for a free initial consultation to evaluate your claim and find out how our Jones Act and Louisiana maritime lawyers can work for you

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